I don’t need to study medicine to see that a child in the womb deserves the same right to life, the same right to strive and prosper, the same right to dream and to create as myself or anyone else. – Luke

I don’t need to study medicine to see that a child in the womb deserves the same right to life, the same right to strive and prosper, the same right to dream and to create as myself or anyone else. – Luke


As a student in the College of Arts, as well as being a musician and aspiring writer, it is increasingly difficult to hold a pro-life view and not feel alienated. I don’t need to study medicine to see that a child in the womb deserves the same right to life, the same right to strive and prosper, the same right to dream and to create as myself or anyone else. The pro-life message is care and compassion for the mother and the child, and that is what I hope to see prevail going forward. It is a message of love and hope for all stages of life.

But my issue is not with the lack of respect for those in creative fields who are pro-life so much as it is with the lack of respect from people in such fields for the artists, scholars and individuals yet to be born, those future great minds still in the womb. As someone interested in the creative arts, I have to say that despite how it may seem, being pro-abortion is not the arty option. Being pro-life in a creative field is a privilege and a gift, and we are severely underrepresented.

Creativity, liberalism; these do not oppose supporting the right to life of babies in the womb, and yet we live in a society where our role models in the performance industry would have us believe being pro-abortion is fashionable. It is not; supporting human rights is fashionable, and I hope that we begin to see that human rights are not restricted to those of us with the power to fight for them.

Students for Life

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